CLOSE

COMING SOON

Today, one of the main environmental priorities is to reduce Global Warming and the revised F Gas Regulation (EC) 517 2014 has been introduced to help achieve this. Key issues in the regulation include converting to low GWP refrigerants and refrigerant containment; preventing leakage of refrigerants into the atmosphere. The Brooktherm F Gas Compliance Programme will help you operate F Gas compliant refrigeration and air conditioning systems which, apart from protecting the environment, will enable you to control and reduce your operating costs.

How Can Brooktherm Help You?

The compliance programme is tailored to your specific requirement and can include:

  • Providing the necessary information and documentation to ensure that you comply with the F Gas regulation

  • Carrying out a site survey and providing a detailed report which would include our compliance and containment recommendations

  • Reviewing the refrigerant types used on site and exploring the potential, and when possible quote, for conversions to lower GWP refrigerants

  • Providing a competitive refrigerant supply quotation and discounts on a full range of high-quality refrigeration tools

  • Access to 24/7 support

F Gas Regulation (ec) 517 2014. Useful Information (a snapshot)

Co2 Equivalent Tons: Co2 Equivalent Tons (Co2 Eq T) is used as a key measuring value for the revised F Gas regulation and it is used for things such as controlling and reducing the amount of high GWP refrigerants placed on the market, to determine the intervals that leak detection needs to be carried out and as a threshold for the virgin refrigerant use ban.

It is an effective measurement tool as it is based on both the system charge and the GWP of the refrigerant contained in the system.

To calculate the Co2 Eq T of refrigerant in a system you divide the kg of refrigerant by 1,000 and multiply it by the GWP of the refrigerant.

For example: 50kg of R404A ÷ 1,000 = .05 x 3922 GWP = 195.25 Co2 Eq T.

Use Ban on High GWP Refrigerants

At the start of 2020 there will be a use ban on virgin refrigerants with a GWP (Global Warming Potential) of over 2,500.

This applies to systems that contain more than 40 tonnes Co2 Eq T of the refrigerant which equates to 10kg of refrigerant R404A.

This means that it will not be possible to top up or recharge these systems with virgin refrigerant after this date.

The use ban does not apply to re-claimed (re-processed) refrigerant which can be used until 2030, however the price is not known and availability cannot be guaranteed.

For details on refrigerants please click here

F Gas Leak Test Requirement

Leak testing under the revised F Gas regulation is based on Co2 Eq T of refrigerant contained in the system.

This enables the GWP of the refrigerant and the system charge to be used to determine the frequency and type of leak detection required.

For details on the leak testing requirement by refrigerant please click here

Co2 EquivalentLeak Detection Required
5 to 50 Tonnes12 months without fixed leak detection / 24 months with fixed leak detection
50 to 500 Tonnes6 months without fixed leak detection / 12 months with fixed leak detection
500 or more TonnesFixed leak detection mandatory / Leak tests every 6 months

Training and Certification Requirements

Site personnel and contractors require City & Guilds or CITB certification in accordance with F Gas training regulation EC/303/2008 before they can carry out work on refrigeration and air conditioning systems containing HFC refrigerants.

Site Personnel and Contractors Certification

There are 4 categories of certification that allow both contractors and site personnel to carry out different levels of work on refrigeration and air conditioning systems. These are as follows:

  • Category I: Covers any size of system and includes leak testing, refrigerant recovery, installation, maintenance and servicing

  • Category II: Covers systems with a charge below 3kg and 6kg for hermetically sealed systems and includes refrigerant recovery, installation, maintenance and servicing. Leak testing on any size of system can also be carried out

  • Category III: Covers systems with a charge below 3kg and 6kg for hermetically sealed systems and includes refrigerant recovery

  • Category IV: Covers any size of system and includes leak testing

Company Certification

As well as personnel certification contractors working on refrigeration and air conditioning systems require a Company Certificate when carrying out tasks such as installation, maintenance, refrigerant recovery or decommissioning.

To gain full company certification businesses need to demonstrate that they employ sufficient personnel, qualified to the minimum requirements of EC/303/2008 to meet their anticipated future work schedules.

They also have to show that they have the necessary tools available and procedures in place to ensure that their customers F Gas emissions can be minimised.

Defra has designated Bureau Veritas, Quidos and Refcom as UK Company Certification bodies.

Record Keeping

It is now necessary for both Operators and Contractors to keep records for each system or piece of equipment that is subject to mandatory leak detection (i.e. contains over 5 Co2 E T of refrigerant).

The records should include:

  • Quantity and type of F Gas installed

  • Quantity of F Gas added during installation, maintenance, or when repairing leaks

  • If the refrigerant used has been recycled or reclaimed and if so the name and address of the facility processing the refrigerant and the certificate number. (New)

  • Quantity of any F Gas recovered

  • The identity of the person carrying out the work and their F Gas certificate number and their F Gas Company certificate number

  • Dates and results for all mandatory leak tests carried out

  • If the equipment was de-commissioned the measures taken to recover and dispose of the F Gas

Records need to be kept either in hard copy or electronically for 5 years.

Labelling

From the 1st January 2017 new refrigeration and air conditioning systems and equipment placed on the market containing F Gases must be labelled indicating that the system/equipment contain fluorinated greenhouse gases, the name of the refrigerant, quantity in kg, and its GWP and the Co2 Eq T of the refrigerant contained.

Conclusion

We have provided a brief overview on what we believe are the most relevant points of the revised F Gas EC 517/2014 regulation for owners and operators of refrigeration and air conditioning systems.

This is just a snapshot of the regulation and please do not hesitate to contact Brooktherm if more details on all or any aspect of the regulation or a site visit is required.

It is clear that the way forward is to operate with low GWP refrigerants and to focus on refrigerant containment.

It is our aim through our F Gas Compliance Programme to provide you with unbiased and impartial advice and support and cost-effective solutions to help you both comply with the F Gas regulation and control your refrigerating operating costs.

Learn more about F Gas Regulations:

F Gas: guidance for users, producers and traders:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/eu-f-gas-regulation-guidance-for-users-producers-and-traders#’operators’-(users)-of-equipment-containing-f-gas

AREA F Gas Guide: A practical guide on the application of the new F Gas Regulation to refrigeration, air conditioning & heat pump contractors:

http://www.refcom.org.uk/media/1181/area-guidelines-fgas-master-3-final.pdf

The Fluorinated Greenhouse Gases Regulations 2015:

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2015/310/contents/made